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Amen

Postby clwilli » Mon Sep 24, 2007 7:43 pm

One of my best memories was riding along with a fellow named Leo, from CA. This was his first Co. I would catch him out early in the morning. Leo was a young 77 years of age. I never felt sorry for myself because I knew he did every mile. I enjoyed hanging around with him at camp. He was quite the ladies man. Doesn't hurt to keep good company. Leo, I hope we see you back next year. The beers on me.
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Postby suziqt » Tue Sep 25, 2007 8:08 am

Cycle Oregon can be hard but if you are looking for a an elite level expierence this ain't it.

YOU SAID IT LOCHMON!!!
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THIS YEAR'S RIDE

Postby wayneh » Tue Sep 25, 2007 6:49 pm

Thanks for "defining" what the experience was for the rest of us.

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Postby Tender Chunks » Tue Sep 25, 2007 8:37 pm

Climbing up Old McKenzie Pass on the last day - a beautiful, moderately challenging climb, which I faithfully did under my own steam, at a (for me respectable) clip of 6 - 7 mph, with few stops, I was passed (quickly) by some stallion standing on his pedals, who had the energy to yell at me "If you aren't going to ride like you mean it, then don't sign up!"

Obviously, this young sprout, suffering from testosterone poisoning, evidenced his lack of appreciation for there being any other experience of life than his own - meaning - taking his youthful energy and freedom to devote to riding and training as a given for all, as opposed to his special situation. I wanted to ask him how many hundreds of hours he volunteered to non-profits this summer, how may days he could have ridden but he decided that spending quality time with his teenage daughter was more important, how many days he decided to devote to his wife's interests instead of riding. I rode 4 times on the roads of Oregon this year, while devoting much time to family, charity and keeping my 20 employees employed and paying some of the best benefits in the construction industry in Oregon.

While this cock-sure lightweight who blew by me displayed his myopic and infantile self centeredness with his comments, I know from talking with the many people who take joy in talking with you on the road and off, that the CO riders who are sympathetic to a whole life which doesn't necessarily have heavy bike training and competition as the nucleus of their personal molecule - are in the majority. I've never sagged, never complained to CO staff - and am glad to be able to ride, despite a busy life with family and business, volunteer work and other obligations that keep me from a lot of training. I think the CO tent is big enough to accommodate the likes of me, and hope that some of the more shallow and inexperienced pretty boys who have time to make disparaging remarks might actually consider that there are other experiences, equally valid, to be had on CO that don't deserve assinine and juvenile commentary.
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Postby Slingshot » Tue Sep 25, 2007 8:45 pm

Just who decides who an elite athlete is and why is it germane to this discussion? Eighteen miles per hour = tourist? Who comes up with this stuff? I didn’t realize that there was an objective measure out there buy which folks were categorized. Is it a government standard? Now, I am sure someone is going to reply with a discussion of race cat rankings 5-1… Who cares?

Folks get so caught up with speed and comparing themselves to one another. I turned off my cycle computer because I didn't want to compare average speeds. Someone asked me how fast I rode and how much I weighed. No really, how much I weighed. I told them fast enough to get here and heavy enough to stay grounded.

Thanks for the sober perspective Tender
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Postby Chuck B. » Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:21 pm

TC, well said. I applaud both your eloquence and the sentiment that eloquence expressed. First and foremost, Cycle Oregon is not a race. Many was the time when some hard-bodied airhead blew by me without so much as a mumbled "On your left" that I wanted to shout out, in a paraphrasing of Tom Selleck's Matthew Quigley, "This ain't the Tour de France, and you ain't Lance Armstrong!" I'm surprised I didn't at some point each day.

I too managed to make it up all of the mountains under my own power. Slowly, but under my own power. For that I feel a lot of pride, but at the same time I hold no derision for those who chose to take advantage of the change in SAG policy that allowed them to ride in cushioned comfort to the tops of the mountains I and many others sweated our way to the top of. To each his own Cycle Oregon experience.

I personally had to feel sorry for those whose whole day was spent hammering their way through the miles and seeing nothing but either their own front tire and a few square inches of asphalt around it, or the rear tire of the bike in front of them in the pacelines they couldn't seem to help forming right outside of the camp each day. To me, those are the people who are wasting their money signing up for CO, but I will defend for eternity their right to do it their own way.

This verbose dissertation is leading to a single point: you do CO your way, and I'll do it mine, and if you don't like how I do it, too bad. Sign up for another ride, or ride on your own, I don't care. Just let me enjoy the tour.
The voices tell the stories. I just record them for posterity.

And the voices have some good ideas sometimes!
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Postby Don Bolton » Wed Sep 26, 2007 10:40 am

Some people are so insecure that they must assert their value on others they perceive as being somehow inferior to them. Its wise to not get caught up in responses and let your temperament get involved.

The cross section of humanity that participates in CO could be an interesting case study (Hmm perhaps a government grant?).

There are a number of people that are just inconsiderate of the others. Carrying chairs off from the dining tent to sit by he stage when for hours yet riders are still arriving to dinner needing these chairs, stopping and blocking entire lanes to discuss things with one another just 50 feet from a pullout area, ignoring upcoming traffic while riding side by side leaving no lane passage but a wide enough gap between each other to pass 2 cyclists (but try passing on the right and they erupt). Passing by inches from you and cutting in front sharply. (plus there are many other things that teeter on the border between arrogance or stupidity)

During "peak hours" witness the long lines and overused blue meanies right in the central core areas when a short walk taking a tenth the time of the line wait takes one to nearly unused and vacant facilities.

It almost seems some of us do the ride to proclaim to ourselves and our peers just how good we are.

Then there are many of us do the ride just to enjoy the experience, make new friends, and find depth and strength we may have not known we had.

There is a vast delta between doing something to proclaim yourself as opposed to doing something to discover yourself.

We all have our reasons for what we do.


Don "I've no idea of my average speeds on CO nor do I care" Bolton

Tender Chunks wrote:Climbing up Old McKenzie Pass on the last day - a beautiful, moderately challenging climb, which I faithfully did under my own steam, at a (for me respectable) clip of 6 - 7 mph, with few stops, I was passed (quickly) by some stallion standing on his pedals, who had the energy to yell at me "If you aren't going to ride like you mean it, then don't sign up!"

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Postby slv0700 » Wed Sep 26, 2007 12:00 pm

Why even waste your breath talking about it. There will always be
idiots out there no matter where you go. The people that are rude
on CO probably never read the forum anyway.
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Postby Don Bolton » Wed Sep 26, 2007 2:07 pm

Well sometimes at least for me, when I objectively look at things that annoy me in others, I find things in myself I could do better.

pot, kettle, <*BANG*> sort of stuff...

Don "whats the sound of ebreath?" Bolton

slv0700 wrote:Why even waste your breath talking about it. There will always be
idiots out there no matter where you go. The people that are rude
on CO probably never read the forum anyway.
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Postby kentieb » Wed Sep 26, 2007 5:25 pm

has this forum really devolved into bragging about moral superiority over rude, faster rides?

<<I wanted to ask him how many hundreds of hours he volunteered to non-profits this summer, how may days he could have ridden but he decided that spending quality time with his teenage daughter was more important, how many days he decided to devote to his wife's interests instead of riding. I rode 4 times on the roads of Oregon this year, while devoting much time to family, charity and keeping my 20 employees employed and paying some of the best benefits in the construction industry in Oregon.>>

Despite the presence of fast, rude riders and slower-riding, self-righteous forum posters (such as myself) I found this to be a very enjoyable Cycle Oregon. The scenery was spectacular and the weather perfect. The only trade-off was, as Jonathan mentioned, losing some of the small town flavor sometimes available on these trips. I, too, am curious about what next year's trip will offer.
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Postby Red Zinger » Wed Sep 26, 2007 7:38 pm

And with kentieb's last sentence, we return to the theme of this topic! :wink:

There were some intriguing suggestions on page 1. I would enjoy a CO tour that regained a bit of that "small town flavor," but the accompanying services are getting so large and complex that I'm afraid some of the communities that would like to host us won't have the space. Anyone for downsizing and simplifying? But, how to do it, that is the question... :?

So, any more rumors about next year?
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Postby Jackson » Wed Sep 26, 2007 7:39 pm

Harney Lake is a Big Lake
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Postby Red Zinger » Wed Sep 26, 2007 10:09 pm

Hmm-mm. Now that sounds familiar. :D
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Postby Hardbike » Thu Sep 27, 2007 11:08 am

Do you think there's a chance CO will repeat the 2001 ride that began and ended in Prairie City? I'll sign up in a heartbeat if they do. Plenty of room for everyone out there.
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Postby joec » Fri Sep 28, 2007 9:45 am

Red Zinger wrote:...Anyone for downsizing and simplifying? But, how to do it, that is the question... :?


Can't help with the rumoring but for downsizing...Ditch the rock star staging...seems like there's a goodly porportion of cost associated with the transport and breakdown of this feature for the week. One of my favorite stops years back was through Joseph. I don't think CO had reached the juggernaut levels of today, frankly I don't remember how the staging and announcements were orchestrated at the time but it did get done. I think that night they had a simple DJ thing setup...danced a jig with the Mayor's wife...

Regarding elitism...this was my 8th tour and I found it the most insular that I've ridden. Since I'm usually in the back (by choice not ability), I try to enjoy a casual mindset, sometimes I crank, sometimes I'm so overwhelmed by the surroundings I'll slow down to a snail's pace to take it in...but always try to give a cheerful greeting to those I pass or those that pass me...didn't get some of the friendly banter and chit-chat I've experienced over the years, in some cases not even an "on your left"...not sure what's up with that...I've learned over the years the CO experience is many tours within a tour depending on what you bring to the party. Oh, I WAS the last rider one day for a brief moment...someone's got to be the cabboose...

No matter, CO20 was a personal victory for me and the experience will stay with me for some time to come...we'll see what 2008 brings...good health and happiness to us all, every one!
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