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We are home & let the rumors fly

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 1:09 pm
by David R
Now that we are home, glowing in remembrence of one of the finest CO's ever, I ask the question, What was Jonathan hinting about with that farewell speech?

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:24 pm
by Routearrows
I suspect, or I actually hope they create a route that has not just one lay over day but maybe two or even three. That would give the "soft core" riders, like myself, an opportunity to explore the area, get to know the town or just relax and the "hard core" riders could hammer out on a loop ride. The other part of the hint "less emphasis on camping" could refer to our starting or staying in a place with a large existing hotel or maybe some sort of temporary yet cushy sleeping structures like yurts. Its going to be interesting to see what pans out!
R.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 8:45 pm
by slv0700
As long as it doesn't cost anymore then it already does; the porter tent is
peaked out for the rent and so is the ride amount. If they make it
anymore expensive, there will be too many people that won't be
able to afford it. So, please keep that in mind if hotel's come up as
a substitute for tents.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 8:51 pm
by Slingshot
One thing i missed this year was spending time in small communities. The riding in 2007 was unparalleled but i missed chances to talk to locals and understand what drives their local economies, what they do for fun etc. I really like the idea of having a central location and doing rides around such a hub.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 9:11 pm
by Routearrows
slv0700 wrote:As long as it doesn't cost anymore then it already does; the porter tent is
peaked out for the rent and so is the ride amount. If they make it
anymore expensive, there will be too many people that won't be
able to afford it. So, please keep that in mind if hotel's come up as
a substitute for tents.


For a week long vacation, Co is very inexpensive, even with T&P and the airfair for many. Some "high end" cycling tours cost 3-5 times what CO costs per day. The thing that makes CO so impressive is that it's such a labor of love for so many. Staff, Volunteers, and riders.
The past week on CO-XX.... "priceless"
R.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 9:41 pm
by casualbik
Dave,
It is always good to get the rumors flying 1 day away from the best ride I think I could complete. What an epic week of riding, climbing and lapping in the scenery of Oregon.

Amazing

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 11:43 pm
by Entiat
What an amazing route. I hope they don't "dial back" the hills too much. While 5 days of epic climbs in a row may be too much, I hope they don't return to too many flat days (those get boring, plus the climb leads to a exciting descent!).

Sounded like perhaps a 3 night stay somewhere, with day-loops and other options for various levels of riders.

It also sounded like at least one night in a motel, perhaps for more money, or perhaps for tent and porter people only (???). My wife and I stayed in the Union Hotel in 2006 for the two nights and a real bed, real shower and real privacy was very nice.

As usual after CO, I still can't believe I've got work, my kids' sports and just general life cranking up tomorrow morning...

...Is it September 2008 yet? :D

Rumors have no logic

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 12:06 pm
by Allyn Rice
:P I don't think there is anyplace in Oregon that could house 2000 riders, plus guests, volunteers, and staff, except maybe a university campus. That would mean spending a week at the campus, and riding different routes from that location. Now we would have to be there when the students weren't, so the event's date would have to change.
:roll: If the ride did go this way, we would not be spreading the wealth as Cycle Oregon was designed. If anyone important happens to read this, I would like to see a scaled down ride, maybe 300 to 350 miles, with more time in the towns, lakes, and rivers. In a really perfect scene, rides from one site to another with an alternate route so those that want to do a 90 mile day are satisfied as well as those that would prefer a 50 mile day.

Rumors....

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 3:05 pm
by clwilli
First of all, it was a great ride, and I applaud CO for putting on a great event. That being said, it's all about customer satisfaction. How many riders would pay again to abuse their bodies over 28,000 ft? Then again how many hard core riders want to come and sit around camp or do 50-60 mile rides? There is a fine line in satisfying the needs of 'all' the riders. I consider this a vacation, and as novice rider, I want to see as much of the state as possible without 'pretending' I'm an elite cyclist. If it's about staying in one place two or three days, I can do that any weekend in Oregon and ride out on my own in any direction I choose camping or doing the credit card trip. My thoughts, don't try to change too much from what is already working. I'll be back again next year if I'm pleased with the product.

Re: Rumors have no logic

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 8:51 am
by aktiv
I think the university campus is one of two likely scenarios. Imagine days riding between UO and OSU, for instance, and I'm aware of others in the area. The dormitories can easily house CO. That was our first guess, and the ride can wend its way around the Willamette.

The other option we discussed was CO using ski resorts - are there any big enough in Oregon though?

A crazy idea was the way a French ride that celebrated Patton's march from Utah Beach to Bastogne (1100 Km in 8 days!) was conducted - we slept most nights on (ride-provided) cots in gymnasiums, with one night in an airplane hanger and another in a gendarme dorm. If you think snoring is loud in a campground, try a nice reflective gym. :-)

Cheers

Keith.
Allyn Rice wrote::P I don't think there is anyplace in Oregon that could house 2000 riders, plus guests, volunteers, and staff, except maybe a university campus. That would mean spending a week at the campus, and riding different routes from that location. Now we would have to be there when the students weren't, so the event's date would have to change.
:roll: If the ride did go this way, we would not be spreading the wealth as Cycle Oregon was designed. If anyone important happens to read this, I would like to see a scaled down ride, maybe 300 to 350 miles, with more time in the towns, lakes, and rivers. In a really perfect scene, rides from one site to another with an alternate route so those that want to do a 90 mile day are satisfied as well as those that would prefer a 50 mile day.

P.S.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 8:54 am
by aktiv
Anyone here remember the option to spend the night before the start of CO V in the UO dormitories?

IIRC, it was also the last mass start of a CO.

Cheers

Keith.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 1:44 pm
by suziqt
I'm thinking..........a coastal route? Lots of little communities there.
QT

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 3:36 pm
by davek
This year was my 13th and I'm on the other side of the CO age demographic, I've seen a lot of rides, both great and not as great. I would be disappointed to see Cycle Oregon take this epic ride down to a bed and breakfast run of 45 miles or less per day. I enjoy hard days with climbs through areas not many people get to see and I like the camping aspect. They'll lose me if they start to make them anyone can do. I was disappointed SAG rides became more acceptable over the years, they used to tell you if you abused them, you would be asked to leave the tour.

CO has addressed some of the issues people raised with the Week Ride, with the Weekend ride, maybe they create another option for those who are challenged by the miles and toughness of the week ride with one that is pointed towards more creature comforts and less physical effort.

Davek

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 3:44 pm
by suziqt
I totally understand what you are saying. Because I only take one week a year to "vacate", I found this year to be very hard at times and missed the tiny towns to hang out in. Last year CO did a fantastic job of utilizing towns. I need to re-think next years ride. :cry:

I'm getting too old and too fussy to camp I'm afraid. On the hard climbs, all I could think about was a beach in Tahiti!! :roll:

SuziQT (quite tired)

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 4:06 pm
by Slingshot
Part of the allure of CO is the challenge. I am sure that this was in the minds of the founders 20 years ago. We don't get nearly enough wilderness and adventure in our lives. We take hikes on the weekends, watch movies about the melting Arctic, take a take a week's vacation... but we are rarely challenged by bodies and our environment. There is a certain calmness experienced when exerting oneself in a beautiful place. When your lungs can't take in any more oxygen, your heart rate rockets towards 200, you hear blood rushing through your ears and you crest a hill to see the indescribable blue of Crater Lake something is right with the world. Keep it hard, keep it rural, keep it relevant...